Other Works By Gamal Williams

In addition to being a series writer, Gamal C. Williams has also become a staff writer for Huami Magazine. Check out his latest work and read about the amazing people he has had the pleasure of highlighting. 

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How does one turn tragedy into legacy? When the Butler family experienced the tragic murder of her father, the question wasn’t first and foremost in Khadijah Butler’s mind. Craig Butler’s life was an inspiration to Khadijah. Her face lights up when speaking about him. “My father was a family man; he was the life of the party. He was big on having a moral compass, and how my sister and I were to be perceived in the world. He was also a very giving man. He was murdered when I was 19, shot in the groin by a 14-year-old boy over a dispute. Yet, in that short amount of time in my life, he dropped so many jewels on me,” she shares.

Gallery Ukwenski at Ghent
Ukwenski Chappell

Black artists and their work have long been marginalized as untrained, uneducated, and lesser than their White counterparts.  The terms “Black art” and “Black artists” by definition prove this marginalization.  The artist is seen as Black first, and then through a less than approving lens, their work is viewed in its own little box, unworthy of comparison to the likes of a Rembrandt, a Van Gogh, a Picasso, or a Warhol.  They aren’t seen as impressionists, abstractists, sculptors, cubists, expressionists, or realists.  They are merely Black artists that make Black art that only Black people could understand and appreciate.  Ukwensi Chappel sees art as art.Black artists and their work have long been marginalized as untrained, uneducated, and lesser than their White counterparts.  The terms “Black art” and “Black artists” by definition prove this marginalization.  The artist is seen as Black first, and then through a less than approving lens, their work is viewed in its own little box, unworthy of comparison to the likes of a Rembrandt, a Van Gogh, a Picasso, or a Warhol.  They aren’t seen as impressionists, abstractists, sculptors, cubists, expressionists, or realists.  They are merely Black artists that make Black art that only Black people could understand and appreciate.  Ukwensi Chappel sees art as art.

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Deputy County Administrator of Public Safety

Eric Watson

A young man is hanging out in his neighborhood with some friends.  The group are approached by two officers, and what started as a calm conversation, quickly turned hostile.  One of the officers told the group to leave the area and go home.  The teenager informed the police that he and his friends were in their neighborhood already, then pointed to his home just a few houses away from where they stood.  He told the officer that was where he lived.  It was to no avail.  The boy complied and began to leave, yet as he passed the officer, the officer began to harass him.  The officer accosted and grabbed him, then slammed him to the ground despite protests from neighbors and his mother as she ran screaming towards the situation.  The boy was arrested for disobeying an officer, fingerprinted, and pushed through the court system, before all charges were later dropped and his record expunged. 

 

During his 27 years in law enforcement, Eric Watson, the former Charleston County South Carolina Deputy Sheriff’s Office Deputy Chief of Operation, fought against occurrences like the one above.  After college, Eric began his law enforcement career as a Detentions Deputy at the Sheriff Al Cannon Detention Center in North Charleston, SC.  After 3 years in corrections, he received a lateral transfer to become a Deputy Sheriff for the Charleston County Sheriff’s Office.  With tours as a patrol deputy, a detective in the Criminal Investigations Division, patrol supervisor, the Office of Professional Standards, and Sheriff’s Office spokesperson along the way,  Eric rose to the rank of Chief Deputy of Operations, one of the highest command positions in the Sheriff’s Office.